Churches United for Healthy Congregations

Improving health through faith and behavioral change.

What are Health Disparities? What is Being Done about Them?

According to the National Partnership for Action to end Health Disparities, a health disparity is a particular type of health difference that is closely linked with social or economic disadvantage.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), health disparities are preventable differences in the burden of disease, injury, violence, or opportunities to achieve optimal health experienced by socially disadvantaged populations.

These disparities are inequitable and directly related to the historical and current unequal distribution of social, political, economic, and environmental resources.

In addition to race and ethnicity, health disparities also exist on the basis of sex, age, income level, geography, sexual orientation, disability, and special health care needs.

Diseases that show high disparities include obesity, diabetes, asthma, HIV Infections, coronary heart disease and stroke, and hypertension.  Deaths in this country affected by disparities include Infant deaths, motor vehicle deaths, suicides, drug induced deaths, heart disease and stroke deaths and homicides.

Perhaps one of the best ways to understand Health Disparities and what they really mean to us is to show how they affect our children.  Young people from racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States suffer disproportionately from a number of preventable diseases and health problems. For example:

     Compared with white youth, black and Hispanic youth have a higher prevalence of asthma,
 overweight, and type 2 diabetes.

·         
Rates of HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, and teen pregnancy are higher among black and Hispanic youth than among whites of the same age.

   
In 2007, black youth accounted for approximately 68% of new HIV/AIDS cases among 13?19 year olds, even though they represented only 15% of the population in that age group.

Hispanic youth experience proportionately more anxiety-related behaviors and depression than do non-Hispanic white youth.


     Among youth aged 10?19 years, American Indians have the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes of any racial/ethnic group.


Suicide rates among American Indians/Alaska Natives aged 15-34 years are more than two times higher than the national average for that age group.

 Efforts nationwide to reduce and eliminate health disparities include:

·         Focusing programmatic efforts to address the needs of adults and youth in high risk groups.

·         Raising awareness about the causes of disparities and about evidence-based strategies
     for addressing them.

·         Building partnerships to address the root causes of health and educational disparities.

·         Documenting the impact of health disparities, as well as the impact of efforts to
     reduce them.

 The following reports give information about what is currently being done to reduce health disparities on a national level.  We can do our part by being aware of what health disparities are and how they affect us, being passionate advocates to reduce barriers to accessing health care and by our continuing efforts to encourage our family, friends and church members to live healthy lifestyles and to seek regular age appropriate screening for chronic diseases. 

Read the Health and Human Services Plan to Reduce Racial and Health Disparities at: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/npa/files/Plans/HHS/HHS_Plan_complete.pdf

Read the CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report and get excellent fact sheets about disparities in diseases to share with your congregations at: http://www.cdc.gov/minorityhealth/CHDIReport.html

 

 

St. Petersburg's New Health Initiative- Healthy St. Pete!

   When Florida’s 67 counties were ranked using the model developed by the University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Pinellas County ranked 33rd in Health Outcomes, Quality of Life and Length of Life. It also showed that the leading causes of death in Pinellas County are chronic diseases, including cancer – most prevalently lung cancer – as well as heart disease.
   This data, and the information provided by our own Pinellas County Health Department, verified what many of us already suspected, or even knew: behavioral risk factors such as poor nutrition and limited physical activity affect the health of our community. Income, neighborhood, gender and race also impact access to health care and affect health outcomes.
   These are outcomes that we can change by working together. To visit the Healthy St. Pete website and learn more about what the City and its partners are doing to resolve these issues, click here.

Distinctive Causes of Death By State


National Public Radio (NPR) recently profiled an analysis of mortality records that uncovered the most distinctive cause of death in each state. In Texas, it's tuberculosis. In Maine, the flu. And in Nevada, it's "legal intervention." Click here to find out more.

Latest Obesity Map for United States


The latest CDC map detailing the prevalence of obesity for all U.S. states based on 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data is now available at www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html. Three additional maps demonstrate obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity for each state.

Check Out Our New Link-Drugwatch


Drugwatch.com is a comprehensive resource about dangerous side effects and complications from commonly prescribed drugs and oft-used medical devices. Their mission is to educate people about medications they take and the devices that are in their bodies and then to provide resources to help people evaluate whether they have a legal case because of life-changing side effects or complications. Drugwatch.com is updated constantly with new information about research breakthroughs, clinical trials, recalls and warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). By making you aware of the risks of certain medications and medical devices, Drugwatch gives you a better chance for quality of life and survival. Go to the links page.

Know Someone Who Needs a Mammogram but Can't Afford One?


Many women who are not insured or "under-insured" forgo getting a mammogram due to the cost.  Pinellas County has two programs that are here to help!  Our Women's Heath page offers more information about no cost mammograms and where to get them.  Just click here to go to the Women's Health page and scroll down that page to Mammograms.

Home Visitation Programs in Pinellas


The Home Visiting Advisory Council of the Healthy Start Coalition of Pinellas, Inc. has put together a two page summary sheet of all the home visitation programs in Pinellas. For those of you who work with expectant and new moms in your congregations, this is a very handy resource sheet.  Check it out on our Women's Health page!

Stroke Support Group

Whether you have suffered a stroke or care for someone who has, you are eligible to attend Northside Hospital's Stroke Support Group. The group which is facilitated by a registered nurse, meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6006 49th Street N., St. Petersburg at 3:00 pm. For more information, call toll free 1-888-598-9586.

Issue Brief:Analysis of Obesity Rates By State


Twelve states currently have an adult obesity rate above 30 percent, according to a new analysis released by the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The analysis used the state obesity rates released made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Mississippi had the highest rate of obesity at 34.9 percent, while Colorado had the lowest rate at 20.7 percent. Twenty-six of the 30 states with the highest obesity rates are in the Midwest and South. Florida came in at 26.6%.   More

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Check Out the Spirit Filled Walking Plan



Walk in Peace and improve your health with the Spirit Filled 12 Week Walking Plan.
This is a simple plan that you can use in your congregations to get folks moving. 
Click here to go to our "A Healthier You" section to see the plan.

Overwhelmed By Federal Grant Writing Requirements?


Then don't miss our new Links Page addition for aspiring grant writers!  HRSA has put out a technical assistance website to help you write that award winning grant application. Just click here and scroll to the end.

Free Health and Wellness Phamplets

 

Looking for some accurate and helpful health information to give out to your congregation? Go4Life at the National Institute on Aging has some for you....for free. Just click here to go to their website.

Educate Yourself! Don't Fall!


Did you know that falls are the leading cause of injury, death, and disability for Floridians age 65 and over?  As a state that ranks first in the nation in the percentage of its residents who are elders, educating our seniors and their caregivers on how to prevent falls in homes and assisted living and medical facilities is vital to the safety of our population.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately one-third of all Americans age 65 and older will suffer a fall each year. Particularly disturbing is the CDC's estimate of 1,800 annual deaths among nursing home residents from fall-related injuries. The most recent Florida Department of Health data show that in 2009, 1,714 Florida seniors suffered fatal injuries and 42,754 others were hospitalized for nonfatal injuries from falls. Traumatic brain injuries were associated with 46 percent of the fall fatalities, while hip fractures related to 32 percent of deaths from falls.

Since the majority of falls occur within or around a place of residence, you can prevent a fall by providing some simple home modifications. Hallways and entrance ways need to be clear. Certain furniture arrangements are better than others. The telephone should be easily accessible for a fragile adult. Hazardous throw rugs can be removed.  An older or infirm person may benefit from a hand-held shower head, grab bars for the bathtub or better lighting.

Falls are a serious problem for our most vulnerable adults. Becoming educated on how to prevent them is the first step in protecting our seniors.  Click here for good tips on how to prevent falls.

2015-2016 Mini Grants

If you are interested in applying for a CUFHC Mini Grant for 2015-2016, please go to our "In The News" page to downlaod the application.

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Relay for Life


The American Cancer Society had a very successful Relay for Life event on Friday, April 27.   CUFHC churches were represented at the event and Carolyn Swanson, our CUFHC coordinator,  was on the planning committee.  Lots of fun, fundraising, and recognition of survivors and those who have lost their battle took place all night and into Saturday morning.  This was all for a wonderful cause:  to eradicate this terrible disease that has taken and affected the lives of so many of our loved ones.  Bless all of you who participated!
(Check out more photos in the Photo Gallery)

In The News

Don't forget to check out In The News to find out the upcoming events and latest CUFHC news! 

Upcoming Events

Monday, Nov 6 at 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Wednesday, Dec 6 at 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Saturday, Jan 6 at 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Tuesday, Feb 6 at 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Look What's New!

HIV/AIDS is a concern to the world and to the African American community. Check out our new HIV/AIDS page to see how you can help spread awareness about this disease that has affected so many lives.

Plan ahead! Check out the link on our Links Page to National Health Observances so you'll know well in advance what each month recognizes for health awareness. 

Check out In The News and Photo Gallery to see the latest events!

First Lady Micehelle Obama has issued a health challenge to all faith based communities! Learn more In the News.

How is your Zone doing?  Send some info in and we'll put it
In the Zone! 

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